2016/01/29

«Alexandra Meldrum: “Time to put people at the core of sustainability policy”»



The Fifth Estate



«The recent COP21 agreement in Paris has been widely hailed as a landmark deal. It signals a shift in international awareness and cooperation, and in the global political will to deliver the practical actions needed to limit the effects of climate change.

»Now comes the challenge of change, and from an engineering point-of-view, Australia is ready to deliver. The COP21 commitments will affect virtually every aspect of our existing policy approach – innovation, sustainability, industry, food and agriculture, energy, resources, cities, regional development, employment and education.

»There are few sectors of our economy and few members of our community that can rightly say they have no role to play. True action is now going to come from a commitment to technological change and innovation, and engineering and the technology it delivers sits at the centre of the next stage of our journey.

»Focusing on energy generation as one aspect of technology – arguably the most central theme in the Paris talks – it’s clear that this is still a live debate in Australia. For the near-term we have to rely on existing coal-fired generators. Like it or not, Australia simply doesn’t yet have the capacity to switch-off existing plants and rely wholly on renewables.

»If policymakers are serious about putting a dent in our carbon emissions, then the long-term option of wholesale investment in renewables needs to be brought well forward and policy settings must change to reflect this.

»Fortunately, the recent COP21 agreement, combined with the government’s efforts to foster a culture of practical innovation in this country, suggests we’re finally seeing a situation where committed practical action is possible.

»Australia faces simultaneous challenges. One of these is to ensure that electricity market policies and existing technologies are designed to ensure that power generation is as efficient as possible until we can reliably flick the switch on large-scale clean generation and storage options, options that are supported by engineering expertise and innovative technology. We can’t afford to downplay our current reliance on fossil fuels.

»Another challenge is innovation. Widespread renewable energy options simply won’t be delivered overnight, and if we don’t consider how we make our existing generation assets work more efficiently in the interim, then we’re not serious about sustainability. Unfortunately, in the rush to enforce ideology from both sides of our climate debate, pragmatic considerations like this often suffer. Nonetheless, this is a problem we can easily address, and the recent maturity of our national policy debate suggests this is a problem we can overcome.

»The engineering profession in Australia has long called for a greater focus on the role of technology and engineering in innovation and environmental policy. Science and research are one thing, but without engineering the practical application of these principles the community never realises any benefit. In the field of sustainability, this becomes a real problem, for it’s only practical action that’s going to allow us to meet climate targets and adapt our built environment and technology to new demands.


The engineering profession in Australia has long called for a greater focus on the role of technology and engineering in innovation and environmental policy. Science and research are one thing, but without engineering the practical application of these principles the community never realises any benefit.

»Entrepreneurs don’t deliver world-changing technologies without the benefit of years of trial and error, and in most cases, decades of education. The government has signalled a clear intention to create policies that support the investigation and commercialisation of new ideas. The next step is to make sure there’s a pipeline of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) graduates to support this vision. This is still an ongoing debate, and it’s a gaping hole in our national innovation policy.

»STEM education begins in primary school. Engineering is built on the foundations of science and mathematics and uses this information to solve real-world problems. Engineering both uses new technologies and also creates new technologies for the good of the community.

»If we’re going to maintain our current standard of living and social, environmental and economic wellbeing then we’ll need to do things differently and we’ll need to innovate – at its most fundamental, sustainability requires innovation. To be truly sustainable we’ll need to do more with less and we’ll undoubtedly need an educated workforce to deliver this reality. We’ll need more smart people and we’ll need to give them the skills to drive sustainable technological change. So often workforce development and sustainability are topics viewed in isolation. Indeed, the two matters are often pursued by radically different ends of the political spectrum. As a member of the engineering profession tasked with developing new technologies and processes to solve our environmental and sustainability challenges, I can say from experience that the two issues are inextricably linked.

»We need to embrace the reality that education can deliver improvements to our standard-of-living (and yes, wealth) that need not come at a cost to our environment and need not impose externalities on future generations. This is the benefit that engineering provides. The complicating factor is that engineering requires education, and education requires investment backed by clear policy action.

»There’s no doubt that Australia gains a sustainable competitive advantage from our people. We have a history of producing world-class scientists and engineers, and we have a clear responsibility to grow this advantage for the good of the community and our future. Is education the key to innovation and sustainability? In part, but it’s one step among many.

»To survive in this changing world we need solutions. We need to have the most capable people we can get, and employ them wisely to deliver these long-term sustainable solutions. Is it time to create a sustainability policy with education and our workforce at its centre? Is it time to make sustainability the central factor in innovation policy? The answer to both questions is a resounding “yes!”.

»Our people are our advantage, and it’s time to build this advantage and put Australia back in its rightful position as a thought leader, not a global laggard.»





The innovation execution

2016/01/28

«David McCourt: “Innovation is Handing Connectivity to the People”»



Yahoo Finance



«Regulation, partnerships and connected people are the three biggest trends that will impact the telecoms industry in 2016, according to global entrepreneur David McCourt.

»McCourt, who has been at the forefront of telecoms innovation over the past 30 years, believes much of this change will come from the developing world, while citing Uber and Airbnb as new companies wielding huge power with their access to customers.


»Regulation will be affected by the passionate few

»"Here in the US, we've already seen a few prime examples of what the future of regulatory and legislative change will look like, with long-time industry leaders being challenged by relatively new start-up," he said.

»"This is perhaps best illustrated by Uber's clash with the City of New York, after legislation that would severely limit the company's operations was proposed. Uber's userbase and drivers intervened on its behalf and ended up having a huge hand in the legislation being abandoned. Travel company Airbnb saw similar success after the state of California proposed new regulations for it. Despite these regulations being supported by the hotel industry in general, and Airbnb only operating roughly three per cent of hotel rooms in the US, their small but passionate userbase was able to make a great impact on the proposed changes.

»"Technology has empowered like-minded communities, regardless of size, to make their voices heard. The amount of startups and other companies circumnavigating traditional structures like lobbyists to have their voices heard, and make real change, is only going to increase."

Technology has empowered like-minded communities, regardless of size, to make their voices heard.

»Public and private partnerships will connect more people to the web McCourt continued: "While these examples have roots in Silicon Valley, the most celebrated centre of innovation in North America, the greatest amount of innovation and change will be coming from the developing world. "Smartphone penetration has been rapidly increasing in many parts of the developing world. However, statistics can be misleading, as very few smartphone users can't afford data plans. There is a demand for fibre in places that are not economically feasible, and the near future will see more public and private partnerships - governments and municipalities partnering with telecom operators - to try and solve that."


»People will find ways to become connected regardless

»"Despite limited connectivity, many young urbanites in the developing world have already found their way on to the web in off-the-grid ways. Apps like FireChat are already enabling those without a conventional connection to create mesh networks to gain access via Bluetooth.

»"The ingenuity and potential of these populations can't be understated - 1,000,000 people per week are being added to urban environments in the developing world. They're not going to have time to build that traditional "power broker" structure up, they'll just bypass that and use crowdsourcing to influence and wield power, in ways that are similar to what companies like Uber and Airbnb have already done in the US."

»McCourt concluded: "As technology progresses, people all over the world will want to be connected to the internet, and will continue to find ways to do so, whether it is in traditional ways or off-the-grid."»





An innovation

2016/01/27

«Rob Enderle: “Ford vs. Cisco: Two ways to approach innovation”»



CIO



«Last week, I talked about how Apple could likely learn from Ford’s approach to innovation, which favors promoting experimentation and shifts focus from blame for failure to encouraging and rewarding experimentation. This week I attended the opening of Cisco’s new Innovation Center in Toronto [Disclosure: Cisco is a client of the author] and it struck me that the differences between Ford’s Research and Innovation Center in Silicon Valley and Cisco’s efforts were very different, but not necessarily mutually exclusive. It also stuck me that a technology company might find both approaches useful. Given that Apple is moving into the automotive space we may, at some future point, see a blending of the concepts.


»Ford’s Research and Innovation Center

»At CES Ford spoke of its relationship with Microsoft [Disclosure: Microsoft is a client of the author] and how their personal relationship with Bill Gate’s and his company allowed them to jump start their in-car technology efforts. FORD Sync, once tied to Microsoft’s technology, and now tied to BlackBerry’s QNX [Disclosure: BlackBerry is a client of the author], became a huge competitive advantage for the firm. Recognizing the power of having tech people and auto people work close together Ford decided to build their Research and Innovation Center in Silicon Valley to create a stronger competitive advantage tied to tech. Silicon Valley remains the technology center of the world.

»This type of Technology Center is inward-focused. It is designed to bring innovation in (from companies like Cisco) early in the car planning process. Because it takes up to half a decade to get a car though the planning process, making sure advancements are contemplated early can go a long way towards assuring that late changes don’t damage either time to market or manufacturing line setup costs adversely.

»This also works against the “not-invented-here” mentality that often plagues legacy car companies by force feeding advancements from outside and both enabling and encouraging collaboration to anticipate and resolve issues in a timely manner and create more compelling solutions. This will likely be critical as we move from cars driven by people to cars driven by computers.


I believe a blending of the Ford and Cisco concepts could go a long way towards making that happen in the U.S. as opposed to China where it currently is more likely to emerge first (or, given the prototype, is already emerging).

»Cisco’s Innovation Center

»Cisco’s effort is largely focused outside and they use their centers as both a showcase for what can be done and a place for their customers to come and work with them to solve problems focused on particular industries. Toronto is focused on smart cities/buildings, healthcare and finance. What is created in these innovation centers is eventually shared with other Cisco customers, which lowers the cost and risks associated with the efforts by spreading them across companies.

»One of the interesting things about the Toronto location was that by using innovations from other centers they were able to lower the build cost by $700,000, lower energy consumption, lower the costs of moves adds and changes, and create a far more friendly workspace that automatically adjusts for the employees using it. It is an operating showcase of how innovation can lower costs and increase employee effectiveness. So much so that the firm managing the building is taking the underlying concepts to all of their properties.


»Blending/contrasting the concepts

»The advantage to the first approach is that advancements are largely contained and focused on Ford exclusively so that change is driven into the company. The advantage to the second is that it improves sales, customer success, engagement and employee effectiveness in the center. The Ford effort has little direct impact on Ford customers and the Cisco effort has far less impact on how Cisco does things than the Ford effort does.

»This suggests a blended approach where a large company has a focused effort like Ford’s and used innovation centers like Cisco’s (to benefit from the lower costs of shared efforts and avoid the expense of solving problems that have already been solved), and their own Cisco-like innovation centers focused on helping customers use products more effectively.

»In Ford’s case this applies mostly to customers buying their business solutions, such as government and delivery companies.

»And here is the key, all of the efforts would be networked so that ideas could flow across them resulting in a synergy between vendors and clients that would be unprecedented in the modern age, but fully enabled with the collaborative technologies we are currently up to our necks in.


»Self-flying cars

»We have long anticipated the idea that someday cars will be obsolete and that we’ll have our own flying car to commute in. That isn’t as far away now as you might think because the technology being developed for self-driving cars and delivery drones should be applicable to self-flying vehicles. One such concept was showcased at CES this year from China with an announced 2016 launch. But it likely is only through the tight integration between companies on the cutting edge of self-driving, transportation, drones and artificial intelligence that this could happen quickly in the U.S. (By the way, for this effort, they might want to include Moller, who has been working on a flying car for decades).

»If we were able to tightly network all of these areas of expertise toward this one goal it suddenly becomes possible. I believe a blending of the Ford and Cisco concepts could go a long way towards making that happen in the U.S. as opposed to China where it currently is more likely to emerge first (or, given the prototype, is already emerging). Something to think about this weekend.»





An innovator

2016/01/26

«Uber gets Toronto taxi brokerage license»



Metronews.ca. Torstar News Service.



«Move puts Uber in same league with major cab companies such as Beck, which have been opposing the service they say is taking away their drivers’ livelihoods. After calls were made for Uber to be brought under the same rules as traditional taxis, the ride-share company says it has been issued a taxi brokerage licence.

»Uber, which links riders with available cabs and also unlicensed drivers through a mobile phone app, said in May it was willing to seek a brokerage licence.

»The brokerage licence doesn’t cover UberX, the service that enables users to hail cheaper rides from drivers who don’t have taxi licences.

»On Friday morning, Uber Canada spokesperson Susie Heath said the city had issued the licence.

»That puts Uber in the same league as a taxi brokerage with major cab companies such as Beck, which have been vocally opposing the service they say is taking away their drivers’ livelihoods.

»“This is another step towards our participation in a comprehensive regulatory solution that includes ride-sharing,” Heath said in a statement. “We will continue to work with the City of Toronto towards new regulations for ride-sharing, which are expected in the coming months.”

That puts Uber in the same league as a taxi brokerage with major cab companies.
“This is another step towards our participation in a comprehensive regulatory solution that includes ride-sharing.”

»Their application followed months of controversy after the city took Uber to court over claims they were operating illegally in the city, a fight that is playing out across North America. But after a superior court judge ruled Uber was operating outside the legal framework and not breaking the rules, council voted to update the bylaws to include Uber and ridersharing companies in its jurisdiction.

»But regulations covering the company’s other service, UberX, which enables users to hail cheaper rides from drivers who don’t have taxi licence, are still being negotiated. Meanwhile, it’s unclear whether Uber is already breaking the rules of the brokerage licence, which prohibits brokerages from dispatching unlicensed cars.

»Breaking these city rules could come with a $50,000-penalty and an additional $25,000 levied against each company director.

»Earlier, Heath said Uber was only seeking the licence, which costs $402.78, for its taxi operations.»





Public Administration and innovation

2016/01/25

Newsletter L&I, n.º 88 (2016-01-25)



n.º 88 (2016-01-25)


Administração Pública e inovação | Administración Pública e innovación |
Administration Publique et innovation | Public Administration and innovation

Um inovador | Un innovador | Un innovateur | An innovator

Uma inovação | Una innovación | Une innovation | An innovation

A execução da inovaçao | La ejecución de la innovación | L’exécution de l’innovation |
The innovation execution



Index


Liderar Inovando (BR)

«Primeira reunião dos coordenadores da Cúpula do G20 em 2016 inaugurada
em Beijing» ( ► )
«Laércio Cosentino: “A transformação do usuário de software”» ( ► )
«João Baptista Vilhena: “Liderar para servir ou ser servido?”» ( ► )
«Game Online da Ford ganha prêmio de inovação» ( ► )

Liderar Inovando (PT)

«Capacidade de inovação» ( ► )
«Adriano Campos: “Os filantrocapitalistas vão salvar o mundo?”» ( ► )
«Ehang 184. O drone com lugar para um passageiro» ( ► )
«Coral Luísa Todi elege hoje órgãos sociais para o próximo triénio» ( ► )

Liderar Innovando (ES)

«El gobernador Domingo Peppo apoyó el desarrollo de un “drone” para fumigaciones en campos» ( ► )
«Francesco Paolo Fulci: “Michelle Ferrero dejó como legado cientos de productos para desarrollar”» ( ► )
«José Rivera Mejía (Instituto Tecnológico de Chihuahua): “La llave que falta es el impulso a la educación e innovación”» ( ► )
«El parón político frena el avance de la economía colaborativa» ( ► )

Mener avec Innovation (FR)

«Thibaut de Jaegher: “L'ordre et le déviant”» ( ► )
«TimeOne, le nouveau géant français des marketing services» ( ► )
«Pourquoi le Mirage 2000 garde toute sa place dans l'armée de l'air» ( ► )
«Une nouvelle thérapie pour vaincre la leucémie myéloïde chronique» ( ► )

Leadership and Innovation (EN)

«Mehlville moves to open innovative project-based elementary school» ( ► )
«Department of the Australian Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C):Turnbull announces Heather Smith will lead communications department» ( ► )
«Banks face recruitment challenges as fintech startups snag talent» ( ► )
«Top city universities falling behind on indigenous enrolment» ( ► )

Licencia Creative Commons Licencia Creative Commons
Atribución-NoComercial 4.0 Internacional








2016/01/22

«Top city universities falling behind on indigenous enrolment»



Tom Joyner. SMH



«NSW's most prestigious universities are falling behind their regional counterparts in Indigenous enrolments, data from the federal Department of Education has revealed. The University of Sydney and the University of NSW have some of the lowest indigenous enrolment rates in the state, with up to one-third that of regional universities. UTS Associate Professor Dr Nina Burridge, who studies indigenous education, said some universities could be doing more to boost indigenous enrolment, particularly if young people were reluctant to move to the city to study.

»"On the one hand I would say that unis are well meaning. But, sometimes, there's a lot of rhetoric rather than reality - the publicity in some ways overshadows the success rates." Kyol Blakeney, an Aboriginal primary education student at Sydney University, agrees. In 2015, he was a keen advocate for indigenous engagement as president of the student representative council.

»Mr Blakeney said the problem lies not in individual outreach programs, but in larger hurdles indigenous young people face with the prospect of moving to study in the city. "The connection to land is very important. For a lot of young people in Aboriginal communities it's quite a big step to move away from home."

»He said larger city universities could be doing more to help indigenous students make the move. "The University of Sydney doesn't have many opportunities for a simple thing like accommodation," he said. "If you live in Broken Hill, no matter how much procedure the uni has to boost enrolments, they're not going to get them to study there. "A high population of Aboriginal people come from a regional, low socio-economic background. Being able to pay for your textbooks and general living, it's a big ask for someone who has just left school."

»But one area of study stands out as lacking enrolments more than any other. Among the 15,000 indigenous students at Australian universities in 2014, only one in 10 enlisted in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) degree, according to Federal Department of Education data.

»As the Turnbull government rolls out its innovation agenda, including an announced $48 million towards improving STEM literacy, education institutions are scrambling to reorganise their priorities.

»"There is an aspirational impediment that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids think they couldn't get into the best universities in Australia, but the reality is they can and they succeed," said Sydney University deputy Vice-Chancellor Shane Houston, who is responsible for indigenous strategy.


There is an aspirational impediment that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander kids think they couldn't get into the best universities in Australia, but the reality is they can and they succeed.

»An event held at Sydney University on Monday saw 226 indigenous high school students from around the nation given a taste of university life, with demonstrations across a variety of subject areas including a pharmacy lab where they were invited to make hand cream.

»"Ultimately I want to be a GP or a surgeon, or maybe even a pediatrician. I'm just going into medical studies to open my eyes a bit more," said André Ross, 18, who is beginning year 12 in Alice Springs this year.

»The three-hour flight from the Red Centre didn't deter Mr Ross, who said: "I'm used to the distance and I don't mind it because they've got Skype and all that now."

»The high school program, which runs all week, is part of the university's long-term strategy of outreach and financial assistance to encourage more indigenous young people to take up study, particularly in STEM degrees.

»Charles Sturt University in Bathurst had the second-highest number of indigenous students nationwide, after the University of Newcastle, in 2014. "There's a very large indigenous population in western NSW so it's a core part of our mission," said CSU's vice-chancellor, Professor Andrew Vann. "But proportionally, indigenous students are much less represented in STEM than in other area. That's something we have to work on across the whole sector."»





The innovation execution

2016/01/21

«Banks face recruitment challenges as fintech startups snag talent»



Alexandra Posadzki (@alexposadzki) . Times Colonist



«With a graduate degree from Columbia University in hand, Nathan Epstein was an attractive candidate for a job in the banking industry.

»Shortly after kicking off his search, Epstein — who had studied applied math, programming and economics — landed an offer writing code for the derivatives trading division of one of the big U.S. banks.

»He was planning to take the gig — until he chatted with Torontobased online investment adviser, or "robo-adviser," WealthSimple.

»"They had a culture and a work opportunity that was totally unlike what was being offered by other places," says Epstein, who found himself moving to Toronto last spring to become a software engineer for the upstart.

»Banks face stiff competition when it comes to attracting and retaining the kind of talent they need to meet the evolving needs of customers in an increasingly digital world.

»In addition to a general shortage of candidates with technical skills, many of the recruits who would have traditionally gone to work for large financial institutions are opting instead for jobs in small financial technology, or "fintech," companies.

»"I don't think it’s any surprise that we are experiencing challenges finding talent, specifically in digital," says Aayaz Pira, vice-president of digital channels at CIBC (TSX:CM). "I don't think that's only for banks. I think that's generally in Canada. Fintechs are finding smart people, we're finding smart people, but generally speaking, digital was nascent in Canada for many years."

»While upstarts allow employees to work flexible hours, wear jeans to the office and play beer pong during lunch breaks, those who work for such companies say the differences in corporate culture go beyond such superficialities.

»Greater learning opportunities, less red tape and the chance to work on problems they feel genuinely passionate about are some of the reasons cited by those who have ditched jobs in traditional financial institutions for a role at a tech-savvy startup.

»"When we want to make a change we talk about it in the morning and we're building in the afternoon," says Darryl Knopp, who took a job with Vancouver-based online lender Grow after a more than 20-year career in the financial services industry.


When we want to make a change we talk about it in the morning and we're building in the afternoon.

»"That's an inspiring environment. It's very difficult to do that at large institutions."

»In fact, the founder of Grow had himself ditched a career on Bay Street, including a stint at the Royal Bank of Canada (TSX:RY), to start the company.

»Kevin Sandhu, who launched the fintech startup in late 2013 after eight years in investment banking and private equity, always loved working in finance.

»"But big, stodgy corporate environments that were so averse to change really, really frustrated me," he says. He was also frustrated with how little the financial services world was taking advantage of new technologies and advancements in data analytics, said Sandhu.

»In an effort to attract tech-savvy new talent, some of the big Canadian banks are modifying their workplaces to bring them more in line with what one might see in Silicon Valley. Last year, Scotiabank announced plans to launch a "digital factory" in Toronto that will bring 350 tech jobs, including user experience designers and data scientists, all under one roof.

»The workplace environment at the digital factory will feel "very much similar" to that of a fintech company, according to Mike Henry, Scotiabank's executive vice-president of retail payments, deposits and unsecured lending. Henry made his comments during a panel hosted by the Canadian Club of Toronto last month.

»Meanwhile, CIBC has sponsored hackathons, launched an innovation lab in Toronto's MaRS Discovery District and transformed one of its workspaces in downtown Toronto into a digital office, complete with pizza parties and a foosball table.

»"The world of banking is changing," says Pira. "You're seeing a lot of the banks talking about how they're trying to adjust their culture … we've done the same. We are fully casual. We're all in jeans."»





An innovation

2016/01/20

«Department of the Australian Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C):Turnbull announces Heather Smith will lead communications department»



Daniel Hurst (@danielhurstbne). The Guardian



«Heather Smith, a senior public servant, takes on the job after facing the prospect of reporting directly to her husband, Martin Parkinson. Malcolm Turnbull has appointed a senior public servant, Heather Smith, to lead the communications department, pre-empting the arrival of Smith’s husband, Martin Parkinson, as head of the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C).

»Smith, a deputy secretary in PM&C, had faced the prospect of reporting directly to Parkinson but government sources said Smith had been considered for some time as next in line for a position as secretary of a department.


Smith, a deputy secretary in PM&C, had faced the prospect of reporting directly to Parkinson but government sources said Smith had been considered for some time as next in line for a position as secretary of a department.

»The vacancy at the top of the Department of Communications and the Arts arose as a result of the then secretary, Drew Clarke, moving into Turnbull’s office as his chief of staff after Tony Abbott was ousted as prime minister in September.

»Turnbull confirmed Smith’s appointment in a media release on Monday. He said Smith had headed the prime minister’s taskforce on innovation, led work on public data policy and taken on a senior role during G20 talks in 2014.

»“She has had an extensive and distinguished career in the public sector in a number of roles and brings a wealth of experience and expertise to this position,” the prime minister said. “I congratulate Dr Smith on her appointment.”

»Smith’s five-year appointment begins on 25 January. Parkinson, a former Treasury secretary who lost his position under Abbott’s leadership, is due to return to the public service as secretary of PM&C on 23 January.»





An innovator

2016/01/19

«Mehlville moves to open innovative project-based elementary school»



Elisa Crouch. Stltoday.com. Image from Mehlville School District on Facebook



«The Mehlville School District is moving to bring school choice to a place it’s not often seen in the St. Louis region — the suburbs. Children in the Mehlville district may have the chance in two years to attend an elementary school with an alternative curriculum — one that uses real-world problems to help students learn and without the restraints grade levels sometimes place on learning.

»It would be a school that parents would choose, and there would be no admission requirements. If more children apply than there are seats available, the district would hold a lottery. That kind of competition for classroom seats has largely been limited regionally to the city of St. Louis. There, district magnet and choice schools, along with independent charter schools, offer language immersion education and schooling that focuses on science, engineering, technology and math.

»Mehlville Superintendent Chris Gaines received preliminary approval from the district’s School Board last week to move ahead with a “Choice School of Innovation” that would be the only of its kind in St. Louis County. The school would use technology and different instruction methods to help children learn at their own pace.

»They could hone their reading, math and science skills by developing solutions to problems in their community — such as hunger or water shortages — and through projects that require critical thinking. And if a firstgrader is capable of fourth grade math, she would learn at a fourth-grade level.

»“We’re not blowing up what folks might consider as traditional schooling,” Gaines told the School Board. “We’re still going to have those opportunities for kids. We’re just going to have some other opportunities for kids who may not be successful in a traditional setting, but might find this more engaging, more exciting, more relevant to what they’re interested in.”


“We’re not blowing up what folks might consider as traditional schooling,” Gaines told the School Board. “We’re still going to have those opportunities for kids. We’re just going to have some other opportunities for kids who may not be successful in a traditional setting, but might find this more engaging, more exciting, more relevant to what they’re interested in.”

»Mehlville would join several other districts who are trying either to meet children where they are, or are attempting match education with the world around them. Pattonville is trying “proficiency-based learning” at one of its elementary schools, grouping children during reading and math instruction based on their skills so that teachers can meet each one where they are.

»The Parkway district offers the Spark! Program, which allows high schoolers to immerse themselves in fields of engineering, bioscience, education, business and others through work off campus. In Affton, juniors and seniors can embed themselves several hours a week at a workplace, such as hospitals and engineering firms, learning while doing the work.

»Mehlville’s choice option for a school with alternative curriculum is unique in the county. In the 1980s, the Webster Groves School District opened the Computer School, a choice school for elementary students that gave children more time with technology than at other schools in the district. These days, aside from size, the are no distinctions between the Computer School and others in Webster Groves.

»In Mehlville, parents don’t have to buy into the new school if they don’t want to. “No one in the region is doing anything like this,” Gaines told the School Board last week. “It moves us from a one-size-fits-all education model.”


»‘Ready for change’

»The school in Mehlville would be modeled after the EPiC school in Liberty, Mo., which has received national attention after it opened in 2014. The first year, more than 1,000 students applied for the 300 available seats.

»“That told me people were ready for a change,” said Michelle Schmitz, principal of EPiC. “What kids do is they solve a project — a water crisis, hunger in our county. They investigate and solve problems. It matches the world around them.”

»The Mehlville school would be in addition to the district’s 10 elementary schools. The plan is to open it inside the former St. John’s Elementary School at Lemay Ferry Road and Will Avenue, near Mehlville High. That building is being used as an alternative school for students from multiple districts with behavior challenges. That program would move elsewhere.

»The proposal was met with excitement from the School Board, which in recent years has grappled with cuts and program reductions — not innovation. The new school would be funded through revenue from an extended summer school and through savings district administration has identified since the fall.

»“It’s an opportunity to put the Mehlville School District on the map for innovation and opportunity for student learning that we haven’t had the ability to do in the past,” said Lisa Dorsey, a School Board member. Board President Venki Palamand called the idea “creative and promising.”


»Leading the way

»Palamand added, “if the Innovative School could be properly funded and executed, Mehlville could lead the way in how students are educated in the St. Louis area.”

»Gaines has studied personalized and project-based learning as a member of the executive committee of the American Association of School Administrators. He’s spoken with educators at EPiC about the project-based approach. In the fall, he began mulling a similar concept with his top district staff.

»“As we sat down and started thinking and scribbling on my white board, we thought, ‘Why can’t we do something similar to that?’” Gaines said.

»The board’s preliminary approval allows district officials to hire the principal and put together the implementation team needed to plan how the school would open and operate. Next winter, Gaines will come before the board with specifics on staffing and operations and will ask for final approval. If the school opens, district officials would have to figure out how to keep children engaged once they move into sixth grade and beyond.

»“If we start this school, Choice of Innovation, and kids go kindergarten through fifth grade in a project-based learning environment, we’ve got to have something ready when they hit middle school and high school,” Gaines said.»





Public Administration and innovation

2016/01/18

Newsletter L&I, n.º 86-87 (2016-01-18)



n.º 86-87 (2016-01-18)


Administração Pública e inovação | Administración Pública e innovación |
Administration Publique et innovation | Public Administration and innovation

Um inovador | Un innovador | Un innovateur | An innovator

Uma inovação | Una innovación | Une innovation | An innovation

A execução da inovaçao | La ejecución de la innovación | L’exécution de l’innovation |
The innovation execution



Index


Liderar Inovando (BR)

«Sergio Luiz Gargioni: “Nova lei vai acelerar a inovação e a pesquisa
no Brasil”» ( ► )
«A Próxima Grande Revolução Não Será Tecnológica...» ( ► )
«A tecnologia que vai mudar a sua vida em 2016» ( ► )
«Inovação em serviços» ( ► )

Liderar Inovando (PT)

«China elaborará mais esquemas de reforma financeira regional» ( ► )
«Bosch Portugal recebe Prémio Produto-Inovação COTEC-NORS» ( ► )
«Inovação farmacêutica e a oportunidade de saber gerir» ( ► )
«Repovoamento do peixe carapau» ( ► )

Liderar Innovando (ES)

«Luis Sanz Menéndez: “La Agencia Estatal de Investigación: ¿Son galgos o podencos?”» ( ► )
«Cellex, el secreto mejor guardado de la ciencia catalana» ( ► )
«Apps para pacientes y plataformas, entre las apuestas de Murcia
por la e-Health» ( ► )
«Las instituciones vascas invertirán 446 millones de euros en actividades de I+D+i en 2016» ( ► )

Mener avec Innovation (FR)

«Web-radio, robot: les profs innovent et le montrent à Paris» ( ► )
«Trois manières de piloter l’innovation» ( ► )
«Pour entreprendre à l'étranger, la Silicon Valley reste le Graal
pour le high-tech» ( ► )
«Séverine Leboucher: “Entrepreneuriat social: sept façons de trouver
des financements”» ( ► )

Leadership and Innovation (EN)

«Driving Innovation through Diversity & Inclusion – Panel Discussion» ( ► )
«One venture capitalist's predictions for 2016» ( ► )
«Five key trends driving 2016 technology for older adults» ( ► )
«CES 2016: Expect smart homes, smart cars and a Volkswagen
electric vehicle» ( ► )

Licencia Creative Commons Licencia Creative Commons
Atribución-NoComercial 4.0 Internacional








2016/01/15

«CES 2016: Expect smart homes, smart cars and a Volkswagen electric vehicle»



Harriet Taylor (@Harri8t). WRCB-TV



«The International Consumer Electronics Show, known universally as CES, will be bigger than ever this year, expanding its Las Vegas footprint to 2.4 million square feet to swallow up 150,000 attendees for a glimpse into the future. But unlike in many prior years, there's no single large overriding theme.

»“It's actually hard to get excited about CES this year because there's no focus,” said James McQuivey, analyst at Forrester. “When you think back about some of the more legendary CES years — they were the years of the tablet like 2011, or the years of the e-reader, which was 2010 — those are years where everyone knew there was one big thing happening and you had to go see them. This year, there is no equivalent of that,” he said.

»Nevertheless, there are still some distinct themes this year: Products that highlight the so-called Internet of Things (IoT), the connected home, autos and virtual reality will all have a big presence. Intel — which is aiming to be a big player in IoT — will officially kick off the event with a keynote from CEO Brian Krzanich on Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. ET.

»“Intel's innovations, which power tablets, wearables, PCs, smart cars, homes, appliances, cloud computing and so much more are serving as the foundation for the burgeoning Internet of Things,” said Gary Shapiro, president and CEO of the Consumer Electronics Association, which sponsors the event. The big challenge companies face in this space will be selling consumers on the idea of the digital home. Each will try to differentiate its smart home offerings based on the seamless nature of the user experience and, increasingly, on security. Expect new partnerships to be announced with content creators, financial services companies and e-commerce players.

The big challenge companies face in this space will be selling consumers on the idea of the digital home. Each will try to differentiate its smart home offerings based on the seamless nature of the user experience and, increasingly, on security.

»Appliance maker Bosch is also positioning itself aggressively in this category. The company is hosting a news conference on Tuesday at 11 a.m. ET and, along with real estate broker Coldwell Banker, co-sponsoring the inaugural Smart Home Marketplace. Other exhibitors within the marketplace include Honeywell, Lowes and Logitech.

»Samsung is expected to unveil new products at a news conference on Tuesday, the official press day for the conference. Also on Tuesday, Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf is expected to unveil new products across several categories including IoT, smart home, mobile, health care and automotive.

»The automakers will also be out in force, with 7 out of the 10 biggest auto manufacturers at the show. The industry is taking over 25 percent more exhibit space than last year and executives are expected to unveil new connected car technology and driverless vehicles. In a keynote on Tuesday night, Volkswagen's Herbert Diess will unveil a new electric car and talk about the importance of electric mobility for the industry. On Wednesday, General Motors CEO Mary Barra will take the stage to share more on the company's next-generation pure electric vehicle, the Bolt EV, first announced at the Chicago auto show.

»Kia Motors will unveil its autonomous driving program and discuss the company's progress and innovation around the connected car experience, according to a press release. Mobileye's Amnon Shashua, the company's co-founder, chairman and CTO, will reveal technology it's developing for fully autonomous driving, according to a press release. Mobileye's products are integrated into a slew of vehicles from automakers including BMW, Ford and General Motors. Wearables will once again be center stage, with one big differences over prior years: Apple has entered the market.

»“While Apple's Watch has had choppy success out of the gates it has helped spearhead a major paradigm shift in the acceptance/adoption of wearables technology along with a number of other players (e.g., Samsung, Microsoft, Fitbit, Jawbone, etc.) in the space,” writes FBR analyst Daniel H. Ives.

»2016 is being called the year in which wearables “disappear,” becoming more fashionable and less clunky. To that end, expect partnership announcements between tech companies and fashion brands looking to break out in 2016. One example: MasterCard. The company which will showcase the ways in which it is embedding payments into consumer products, enabling purchases with the tap of a ring or flip of the wrist, building on an announcement made back in October.

»One category analysts agree will present some excitement is augmented and virtual reality. “The big buzz heading into CES 2016 is around 'rolling out the red carpet' for virtual reality products/headsets/software,” writes Ives. Analysts expect the battle over VR to kick into high gear as new platforms hit the market in 2016. Facebook's Oculus Rift, HTC Vive and Sony PlayStation VR are getting ready to release their platforms in the first half of the year, and the success, or failure, of those products could alter the landscape for years to come.

»McQuivey likens the VR market today to the personal computing market in the 1990s. Everyone understands that the technology will be powerful and significant, but most households still cannot afford the real deal. That's likely to remain the case through 2016, he said.

»“That doesn't mean you can't go buy Google Cardboard and put your phone in front of your eyes but that will actually make you sick. The really high-quality VR like Oculus, the really high-quality mixed reality like HoloLens, those things are immediately understandable from a consumer perspective ... it's just that we're not going to see very many of them during 2016,” said McQuivey. When VR gets to the point where it works flawlessly and is affordable, it will be “a life changer,” he said.»





The innovation execution

2016/01/14

«Five key trends driving 2016 technology for older adults»



Laurie Orlov. Aging In Place Technology Watch Search. Industry Market Trends, Research & Analysis



«A look back to look forward. Consider the context for 2016 innovation, despite (or as a result of) a still-erratic economy, and smaller-cheaperbetter base technologies. At the same time, the assisted living industry watches residential age climbing – over half now are 85+. So the desire (or perhaps the only option) to age at home has further intensified. That has created opportunities like the AARP and Leading Age funds; research initiatives like Baycrest and Philips AgingWell; and startup pitch events like Louisville Innovation Summit, or Aging 2.0. Based on looking back at 2015, here then are five categories of trends for 2016:

»Voice: Innovators will activate a variety of applications. CES 2015 explosion of technologies generated lots of noise, and even products, some specifically useful for older adults, some for health, some less ready and/or more far-fetched possibilities. But late January, Amazon made its Echo – a voice-activated smart Pringles can -- offering available to consumers with an API for others to use to experiment. Hopefully we will see the fruits of Amazon’s $100 million Alexa fund investments. By the end of 2016, more products of every type will be configurable, sort-of smart, and be activated by voice, including, unfortunately, car technology. The creepy-factor of always-listening devices will need to be addressed – when they misunderstand instructions, interrupt a (human) conversation, or well-meaning but wrong-headed folk try to substitute voice-enabled sort-of-robots for human care.

»Wearables: Not your mother’s medical alarm -- PERS will branch out. It was inevitable that fitness wearables were just a first pass at health-on-the-wrist. Apple watches were a hyper-hoopla distraction at first, but their presence set the (uh) pace for acceptance for more wrist-based smarts – despite the failure of minutes-too-late Lively. In 2016, expect to see more health-wearables that are usable by older adults. They will include PERS functionality and more PERS technology linked with other data sources – look for smarter fall detection, proximity sensing, geo-fencing, and/or integration with health data.

»Home care: Home care’s hot entrepreneurs cast new light on caregiving apps. In April, an industry not known for innovation got a few $20 million investor jolts – Honor was launched in San Francisco, then HomeHero in Los Angeles was infused in June with $23 million, and New York-based Hometeam received $11 million in July. All of these companies will depend on software like ClearCare and even dedicated devices to power and monitor home health status – or even their labor force. Expect 2016 to bring more care delivery technologies as well as monitoring home (and home health) care workers.

Home care’s hot entrepreneurs cast new light on caregiving apps.

»IoT: From hype to a (more) supportive Internet of Caring Things. The Internet of Things in 2015 was still a cacophony of mostly-nonsense communicating thermostats and toasters. And the security issues associated with it are no laughing matter. Forrester noted in July that the Smart Home might not be a standalone growth area. In 2016, let’s assume that tech companies will rise to the challenges of protecting identity, personal data, and health status from connected devices and associated websites.

»Telehealth: Insurance companies and government begin to see the picture. Long-predicted and now even progressing through legislation, telehealth (remote monitoring, consultation, prescribing) will see inevitable expansion in 2016. Experts expect continued obstacles – but as deductibles add up, healthcare delivery and drugs will drive costs up – and for adults aged 65+, over their lifespan, higher still. As life expectancy rises along with the effects of chronic diseases and lifestyle, telehealth approaches and smart ways to deliver care more cost effectively will prevail.

»Not yet trends in 2016, but soon: With the aging and highly distributed older population growing, it’s a good time to get the bugs out of smarter technology like avatars, robots and AI: this week, the first Baby Boomer turns 70. Next week, CES begins. Let's hope there's a useful connection.»





An innovation

2016/01/13

«One venture capitalist's predictions for 2016»



Harriet Taylor (@Harri8t). CNBC



«Next year will be big for companies working in virtual reality, edtech and e-commerce, said New Enterprise Associates general partner Rick Yang.

»For virtual reality, which has been on the fringes of the mainstream for many years now, expectations could not be higher, Yang said. “I think 2016 will be a tipping point for VR. I think it's probably not quite in the way that a lot of people think it will be,” said Yang. Though Oculus, owned by Facebook, continues to lead when it comes to VR, it's Rift product requires substantial investment on the part of the consumer.

»Time will tell, of course, but Yang believes real growth in VR will come from adoption of the more lightweight mobile VR headsets like the Samsung Gear VR — which is powered by Oculus — and Google's Cardboard.

»“The fact that Google is so big today in education, in distributing products to schools, I think they're going to continue that trend,” he said. With or without any assistance from VR technology, edtech is also poised for rapid advances in 2016.

»“People are starting to understand the power of this educational content, and I think people are willing to pay for it, so I think it's going to be a big year from a monetization standpoint of high quality, highly produced educational content,” he said.

»E-commerce companies will also continue down a path some started this year — that of opening physical stores. Warby Parker, which sells high-end glasses, already has one, and mattress maker Casper, which has experimented with pop-up stores, are possible candidates, Yang said. (NEA is an investor in Casper.)

»Autonomous products — such as drones and self-driving cars — will see rapid innovation and substantial investment next year, said Yang. Those best positioned to profit from those technological advances will be companies already in the market and gathering data.

Autonomous products — such as drones and self-driving cars — will see rapid innovation and substantial investment next year.

»“When it comes to autonomy in machine learning, it's all about the data. If you have access to that data — especially if you have access to proprietary data — that just gives you a huge leg up,” he said. This is particularly true when it comes to autonomous vehicles, says Yang. All the data collected allows automakers to better understand driver behavior and continuously tweak algorithms to improve accuracy and safety.

»“Folks like Tesla that have already built in certain aspects of autonomous driving one step at a time,” he said. “I think those guys are going to be very well poised as regulation allows them to step beyond the bounds of the features they're building today from an autonomous driving standpoint.”

»When it comes to start-up funding and exits, 2016 is likely to be a more challenging funding environment than the first half of 2015 was, Yang said.

»“I do think the valuations got ahead of themselves over the past two years. And so you'll see a little bit of cooling off from that front. I don't think you'll see a lack of funding options, I just think they'll be at a discount to where, you know, valuation multiples were looking in the past two years.

»For early-stage companies: “I don't think anybody expects any slowdown in innovation at the early stages. And so from a funding perspective, when you are investing in these early stage companies, it's a little bit less about the valuation just given the nature of the market,” he said.

»When it comes to exits, the trend of staying private longer will persist and tech giants — from Facebook to Apple — will look to acquire startups to maintain growth and obtain new technologies, said Yang. “I don't think that any of the big tech companies are scared of acquiring companies right now, they still have quite a bit of cash on the balance sheets. And as I kind of mentioned in one of the previous questions, I do think they're looking to other services outside of their core products for growth in the next year,” he said.»





An innovator

2016/01/12

«Driving Innovation through Diversity & Inclusion – Panel Discussion»



NYHRPS



«Wednesday, 06/15/16

»8:00 am - 10:00 am

»CUNY Graduate Center

»To many, Diversity and Inclusion in companies has historically been focused on ensuring the right legal protections and striving for diverse representation. Today, the focus has broadened to diversity and inclusion as core business drivers, which can be seen in terms of talent acquisition and retention, customer relationships, and especially, innovation. This session will be moderated by Jennifer Brown, subject matter expert and thought leader, and feature several leading Diversity officers from a variety of industries who will speak to their strategies and the impact of their Diversity and Inclusion efforts on innovation and the bottom line.

»Moderator: Jennifer Brown is the Founder and CEO of Jennifer Brown Consulting, a certified woman- and LGBT-owned strategic leadership and diversity consulting firm specializing in the future of the workforce and workplace, and dedicated to building more inclusive organizations where all kinds of talent can feel Welcomes, Valued, Respected, and Heard. Based in New York City and maintaining a global team, the company partners with HR, Talent Management, D&I and Business leadership on change management efforts relating to human capital, including the design, development and facilitation of customized, interactive classroom and online learning events, and is known as the creator of the ERG Progression Model, a proprietary development tool that facilitates the transformation of ERGs into true business partners.

»Employer-of choice clients include Cisco, Toyota Financial Services, Wells Fargo, Societé Generale, Thomson Reuters, AXA, Disney, New York Life, Target, and many of the Fortune 500. Jennifer is quoted frequently on next generation diversity and inclusion practices, has delivered two TED talks, and is a dedicated and visible change advocate in the LGBT and Allies community.

»Panelist – Patricia A. David is a Managing Director and the Global Head of Diversity for JP Morgan Chase. She is responsible for developing and implementing a diversity strategy for the organization in line with the business strategy. She works with key business leaders to design, implement track and report on the ROI of various diversity initiatives. She leads the firms JP Morgan Chase Diversity Council in collaboration with key business leaders.

»She also works with the HR community to implement Affirmative Action plans and ensure compliance. Prior to joining JP Morgan Chase, Patricia David was a Managing Director and the Global Head of Diversity for Citi’s Institutional Clients Group. In 2012 she was selected by The Network Journal as one of “25 Influential Black Women in Business,” as a Top Diversity Executive by Black Enterprise and by Savoy Magazine as one of their “Top 100 Most Influential Blacks in Corporate America.”

»Born in Birmingham, England, Ms. David received a B.S. in Finance & Economics with a minor in Accounting from Fordham University in 1981.


To many, Diversity and Inclusion in companies has historically been focused on ensuring the right legal protections and striving for diverse representation. Today, the focus has broadened to diversity and inclusion as core business drivers, which can be seen in terms of talent acquisition and retention, customer relationships, and especially, innovation.

»Panelist – Sabrina A. Griffin is responsible for managing leadership development programs geared towards women, people of color, and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender employees; identifying diverse talent recruiting sources; acting as liaison to numerous employee resource groups; and partnering with strategic business units to tap diverse markets. She reports to the chief diversity officer. A 31-year employee, she has served in corporate regulatory compliance; as an underwriting and financial consultant for self-insured clients; as a risk manager; and as a financial services-industry underwriter. She is a member of the Chubb Women of Color Leadership Book Club and a former officer of the Multicultural Development Council and advisor to the Chubb Black Enterprise Network.

»Sabrina was the recipient of the 2006 Central New Jersey Tribute to Women and Industry Award. She earned her B.S. degree in Marketing and Management from New York University, an MBA in Finance from Pace University and the A.R.M. professional certification.

»Panelist – Donna A. Wilson is Senior Director, Global Diversity & Inclusion, Consumer with Johnson & Johnson, responsible for developing and implementing the strategic diversity management initiative for the Consumer business sector on a global basis. She is a champion for change efforts related to managing diversity; for increasing organizational capacity to include multiple dimensions of diversity and for developing organizational capability to leverage the value and contributions these dimensions bring to the enterprise around the world.

»Previously Ms. Wilson was Vice President, Global Diversity and Inclusion with American Express Company. She was responsible for strategic direction of the U.S. Diversity Council and Global Diversity Council chaired by the company’s Vice Chairmen. In 2005, Donna A. Wilson received the “Urban Angel Award” from the New York Theological Seminary, and the “Civic Spirit Award” from Women’s City Club of New York, Inc. The Network Journal, the small business magazine for black professionals, named Donna one of its “25 Influential Black Women in Business.” She has also been cited in Crain’s New York Business magazine’s “Top 100 Minority Executives” and “Top 40 Under Forty.”

»Ms. Wilson earned a master’s degree in Education with an emphasis in integrated studies from Cambridge College, Cambridge, MA.»





Public Administration and innovation